Pat Ellis has accomplished a lot during his 40 years in the construction industry. He played a significant role in helping Thomas & Marker develop into the strong and dedicated company that it is today, and his efforts have not gone unnoticed by his colleagues.

At a recent gathering to recognize our associates’ years of service, we had the opportunity to hear more about Pat’s history in construction and the path that led him to Thomas & Marker. Our former President and co-founder of Thomas & Marker, Harold Marker, reflected on Pat’s career by sharing a timeline of his journey over the past 40 years. After the reception, we asked Pat to do some reflecting of his own and expand upon Harold’s notes.


Pat

“I grew up in the construction industry. My father was in construction and had a construction company, so I worked summers for him from the time I was 14 until I joined T&M after graduating from OSU in 1975.”

Harold

“When Thomas & Marker was in its infancy, I interviewed Pat Ellis on April 27, 1975 at LK Restaurant South in Bellefontaine, Ohio. We offered Pat a position with T&M, which he accepted after a few days of deep thinking. I was most pleased that he chose to be a T&M associate in lieu of other suitors: Exxon of Texas and Flour of California.”

Pat

“I had three opportunities upon graduating from OSU: Exxon (a large oil company), Flour (one of the top three construction firms), or graduate school with a scholarship in Environmental Engineering. As I was contemplating my decision, Harold asked me if I would come back and work for T&M.”

Harold

“Pat immediately added strength to our company’s bidding, purchasing, and management needs. From the moment T&M formed, we were one of four small, commercial construction companies in the Bellefontaine area, all of which were competitive contractors. We knew that Pat’s competitive spirit would serve him well in his role.”

Pat

“I think the analytical part of engineering helped me become a problem solver. I don’t give up easily. When I see or have a problem I try to stick with it until it’s resolved – sometimes to a fault. I’m not a creative person, but I enjoy coming up with creative solutions and bringing my ‘stick to it’ mentality.”

Harold

“Pat and his team worked diligently to win the mix of construction contracts necessary to keep a quality work force with continuous annual work. This required bidding approximately 60 projects per year – some small, some large.”

Pat

“I feel blessed to have been given the opportunity to work on such a variety of projects – from water and wastewater treatment plants, to critical care areas in hospitals, to complex pits in industrial, to anechoic chambers, to schools and universities. The variety has always kept the job interesting and challenging as you learn nuances about each industry. I do not think I would have had the opportunity to experience such a vast variety of projects and responsibility at my young age elsewhere, and I thank Harold for giving me these responsibilities and latitude.”

Harold

“During his 40 years of special efforts, Pat continuously displayed integrity, motivation, accuracy, perseverance, sincerity, and ethics. In addition, he is an upstanding person.”

Pat

“The biggest lesson I’ve learned is you have to dig into the details of a project and get to know it inside out. Unless you do, you cannot gain the respect of others as you are trying to demonstrate knowledge of the issue. It takes time and effort to thoroughly review each issue before speaking. Information-gathering on any topic is so much easier now – the resources are available on about any subject you need. You have to be willing to put the effort into finding it.”